General Science

  • Solar plate consists of which type of cell?

    • Fuel Cell
    • Photovoltaic Cell
    • Both of the above
    • None of these
  • How many times a normal man respires per minute?

    • 10-15 times
    • 20-25 times
    • 14-18 times
    • 72-100 times
  • Which of the following is not a Vector Quantity?

    • Acceleration
    • Velocity
    • Speed
    • Displacement

    A vector quantity is a physical quantity that possesses both magnitude (size or quantity) and direction. It requires both a numerical value and a specified direction to be fully described.

    Example: Velocity is a vector quantity. It represents the speed and direction of an object’s motion. For instance, if a car is moving at 60 kilometers per hour towards the east, its velocity would be 60 km/h in the eastward direction.

  • Sound travels fastest in

    • Vacuum
    • Solid
    • Gas
    • Liquid
  • The muscles, tissues and blood all are made up of

    • Fats
    • Minerals
    • Proteins
    • Vitamins
  • Which is used as an electrode in a dry cell?

    • Molybdenum
    • Lead
    • Graphite
    • None of these

    In a dry cell, the positive electrode, known as the cathode, is typically made of a carbon rod surrounded by a mixture of manganese dioxide and an electrolyte. It facilitates the reduction reaction, where positive ions from the electrolyte gain electrons to generate electrical energy. The negative electrode, called the anode, is usually a zinc container that participates in the oxidation reaction, releasing electrons into the circuit. With the help of an electrolyte, such as a mixture of ammonium chloride and zinc chloride, the dry cell enables the movement of ions between the electrodes, allowing for the flow of current and the provision of electrical power for portable devices.

  • Which of the following is a water-soluble vitamin?

    • Vitamin A
    • Vitamin C
    • Vitamin D
    • Vitamin K
  • Anemometer is used to measure:

    • Velocity of wind
    • Humidity
    • Temperature
    • Velocity of sound